Quiet operation is one of the things people love about heat pumps, but they don’t run in complete silence. The humming sound the fan emits when changing cycles, for example, is perfectly normal. Other noises, however, can signal a serious issue. If the heat pump you rely on for comfort in Orlando, FL is making an unexpected racket, listen for these sounds. Identifying problems early on can save you from the expense of a major heat pump repair.

Hissing Noises

Heat pumps use refrigerant to move heat from one location to another. This is accomplished by using pressure to change it from a liquid to a gas and back again. A hissing sound often indicates that somewhere in the system, the pressurized refrigerant is leaking. This issue requires prompt attention from a qualified service technician.

Ductwork Din

In central air systems, noisy ducts are typically caused by problems with air pressure. Poor airflow in the return-air channels can make the ducts emit a high-pitched whine. A roaring sound, on the other hand, can mean the ducts can’t handle the air velocity. Ductwork rattling against structural framework can also add to the din.

Bangs and Drums

Clangs, bangs and thumps usually suggest that something is loose in the workings. A component in the blower or motor may have shifted out of alignment or broken loose from its bearings. A timely heat pump repair can protect you from having to replace the entire system.

General Increase in Noise

If you notice a noise-level change from season to season, lack of heat pump maintenance might be the cause. Without regularly scheduled care, heat pumps are forced to run longer and louder to keep you comfortable. Well-maintained heat pumps use up to 25-percent less energy too, saving you money on monthly utility costs.

When you live in Orlando, or the surrounding area, your air conditioner or heat pump is essential to your comfort. Trust the experts at Frank’s Air Conditioning to solve any noise-related problems. To learn more, explore our HVAC services or call us at 407-278-1981.